Thursday, January 18, 2007

Update on Ug

Ug is doing well. I took her to the Vet who said she was definitely going to survive if no infection from the cat’s saliva. Pidgeons are very vulnerable birds.
So Ug is on heavy penicillin now. One drop per day in her beak and crème for her big wound twice per day.

She is extremely tame and not at all difficult to handle for her medication.
The Vet says she is tame because pidgeons are stupid birds. Their skull is too small for brains….
I think that she still remembers the time I raised her. She walks in and out of her basket and knows exactly where to find the food. Not panicking at all, knowing her way around too well.

Right now she sits on my arm, brushing herself which causes a shower of broken large and tiny fluffy feathers. You can see moving is painful. Although she would like too, she can’t hide her little head between her shoulders to sleep. Apart from a big wound under her wing, there is also a wound on her shoulder and neck. And of course her muscles will ache as well. No doubt she won a rough fight with a cat.


She loves sitting on my arm and doesn’t mind me typing and answering phone calls in the meantime.
As a veterinarian nurse I handled a lot of animals and this still seems to continue although I have a totally different job now.
What always touched me (and still does) is the endless faith of the animals that sense you are only doing well.
Maybe I am turning into an old sod, but I can get tears in my eyes watching this badly damaged pidgeon who has all reasons to be afraid, sitting on my arm, brushing her feathers or fast asleep.

2 comments:

  1. Norman Musgrave3:39 pm

    Ug is one very lucky pidgeon!
    Presumably the 'wild' variety have the same instinct as the 'homing pidgeon' and so Ug was able to find her way back to somewhere she would be looked after and nursed back to health.
    I think this tale has the basis for a lovely children's story book -
    "The Adventures of Ug!".
    You could include all the various happenings in Ug's life and her relationship with the other birds and animals in your care.
    Now there's a whole new career for you (as if you hadn't got enough to do already!).
    Norman Musgrave

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  2. She is indeed a lucky pidgeon and a funny one too! Right now she sits on my arm, pulling out damaged feathers. The wounds are healing quickly and as soon as she has all her feathers back, she can be released :-)

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